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Sweater Week: Featherweight Fabric!

It’s the final day of Sweater Week (to go back to the beginning, click here), and today I want to talk about fabric – specifically, fabric as it relates to the CustomFit Featherweight cardigan.

Since CustomFit builds your Featherweight specifically to suit your gauge, you can make your CustomFit Featherweight in any yarn, and any gauge, that you like. Which is fantastic! But it begs the question – what would you like? How will your chosen yarn translate into an entire garment?

This post is about a few different directions you might take, and how the fabric could behave in each.

Speaking personally, the thing I loved most about the original Featherweight is the whisper-light character of the fabric. To create something so wispy with my needles was an enticing and unusual idea, when the pattern was first released in 2009. I grew up in Maine, knitting with thick, scratchy (I’ll admit it) wool because the outside wanted to kill me and wool kept that from happening.

Featherweight, on the other hand, was part of this growing awareness (for me) of sweaters being more than… well, more than just weather protection, I guess. Sweaters as garments, that I wanted to wear. Which sometimes meant something a little more lightweight, a little less heavy.

I’m keeping to the spirit of the original with my own version, while giving a nod to my intense love of drape. Quince and Co.’s Tern fits the bill perfectly: A fingering-weight blend of wool and silk, it will give me a whispery fabric that hangs well and has fluidity and a bit of shine.

Since I’m a wool-silk blend kind of girl, when I went diving in my stash bucket, I came up with a few different yarns that would make a very similar garment:

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(From gray swatch, clockwise: Tern, Blue Moon Fiber Arts Luscious Silk, Sweet Georgia Merino Silk Fine, and Mrs. Crosby Loves to Play, Hat Box.)

A fairly thin wool silk blend is (in my opinion) a great option if you’d like to keep your own Featherweight close to the original. The fabric will be fine, the silk adds glorious drape to the mix, and your sweater will feel light-as-air.

An alpaca blend would be my next suggestion for drape-seekers: Alpaca-based yarns and blends will be warmer than the yarns mentioned above, and might produce a sweater that’s a little less “Featherweight”, but the fabric will still have good drape and motion. Hannah is using Quince and Co.’s Owl, which I think is a glorious option. Her CustomFit Featherweight will be warm, snuggly, and still hang beautifully.

I went poking in my stash bin again, and found a few different alpacas that I think would be nice:

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(From purple swatch, clockwise: Blue Sky Alpacas Royal, Shibui Baby Alpaca held together with Staccato, and Rowan Lima.)

Or maybe you’d like a Featherweight that’s a bit more, shall we say, “instant gratification”? If a fingering-weight garment isn’t your thing right now, there are plenty of larger-gauge yarns that can produce a nice light fabric.

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Two that I want to mention in particular are Blue Sky Alpacas Brushed Suri, which produces a gorgeously floaty fabric in a bulky gauge. You can see from the picture how light and airy this is – despite being 3 stitches to the inch! The other swatch pictured, in Brooklyn Tweed Shelter, would make another larger-gauged but lofty alternative. Since Shelter is woolen spun, it produces a warmer, thicker sweater that is still very lightweight for its gauge. (Please note that since it’s low-twist as well, the yarn tends to be more delicate.)

Finally CustomFit opens up options for making Featherweight in an entirely different sort of fabric, too. Here are a few less-traditional yarns I’d love to see the sweater in:

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The dark green yarn is Shibui Knits Linen, a chainette-construction linen that’s futuristic and crunchy. You can see from the swatch how wonderfully the fabric moves, and I think it’d make a lovely Featherweight.

Moving around clockwise, the next in line is Harrisville Designs’ Silk and Wool, a nubby, rustic-looking but lightweight tweedy yarn. I love this yarn, and have used it for a couple of sweaters. The fabric is light and has nice motion without being fluid; I think it would make a really interesting spring Featherweight. (Next year’s Cardipalooza, perhaps?)

Finally, I think Blue Sky Alpacas Techno would make a really interesting version of Featherweight. Techno is a bulky yarn, but its construction – super-light alpaca fibers blown into a fine netting, almost like a luscious yarn sausage – make for an incredibly light and warm fabric. There’s so much air in Techno that it doesn’t produce a drapey fabric, but I think it would make a really great variation on the original.

Not sure what kind of Featherweight your yarn will turn into? Here are a few things you can do to test the waters before creating your own Featherweight pattern.

  1. Swatch. I know, this hasn’t been the most fun thing in the world, in the past. But remember: You can’t get the numbers wrong. So make a nice big swatch, enjoy knitting with this yarn, and then wash the swatch as you would wash the sweater. Let it dry thoroughly without pinning.
  2. Play. Play around with the fabric. Move it around, stretch and squeeze and poke and prod it. Try to imagine a bunch of it all together.
  3. Consider another swatch if you’re unsure of the fabric. Go up or down a needle size, and see how things change.

And then share here in the comments or in in the Ravelry group! What are you using, and how does your fabric feel?

Sweater Week: I’m a Copycat

My involvement, and eventual employment, with CustomFit began because I’m a copycat.

When I saw Jackie’s gorgeous Alpha sweater, I knew I loved it. Though she’s smaller than I am, and I’m a good six inches taller, we have a similar shape — broad shoulders, a small bust, a preference for longer sweaters. Fortunately for me, Jackie was gracious enough to let me know what options she chose in CustomFit!

So I started knitting away, copying this sweater…

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And by the time I finished, not only did I have a sweater I loved, but I worked for the company that created it too!

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I’m not a knitwear designer, and don’t have much of a desire to be — it’s so much more fun to let others come up with the ideas. And luckily for me, I work for one! This means, nearly a year after I started working for CustomFit and Amy Herzog designs, I’m coming full circle: it’s time to copycat Amy! My third sweater for the Fall Festival KAL uses the same design elements as one of her upcoming patterns … even down to the colorway of the yarn.

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And even though Amy and I have very different body types, when I tried on her sweater I was surprised by how great it looked on me! The sweater is done, but I’m not happy with the cowl, so I’ll be ripping while my colleagues are off at Rhinebeck. I’ll share final photos when I have them!  In the meantime, here’s a teaser…

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Sweater Week: Stonington

For the last sweater release of Sweater Week, I wanted to share something that makes me think of New England fall. Meet Acorn Trail’s little sister, Stonington:

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Stonington started with a yarn, and a desire to create a sweater similar to Acorn Trail, but that was simpler to knit.

The yarn is Harrisville WaterSHED. Watershed is a wonderful yarn to work with – it’s woolenspun, so it’s lightweight and lofty. But it’s spun a bit more sturdily, so it will wear beautifully over time. It comes in a beautiful color palette, and is rustic enough to evoke everything warm and woolen about knitting.

With such a classic yarn, I wanted Stonington to match: To be a classic cardigan shape with a definite fall look, but on the easier side, skill-wise. It is both extremely simple to knit and has just enough detail to produce a timeless, wearable sweater. The lines evoked by the 2×2 ribbed sleeves and ribbing detail on the cardigan’s fronts allow it to be dressed up, and the earthy tweedy wool makes the sweater equally as comfortable with an old pair of jeans.


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As written Stonington has a low-hip length and full-length sleeves, but as usual (now) you can change those options when you create it via CustomFit. And like all of my other designs being released this week, CustomFit is where you can get a Stonington of your own.

Click here to get started!

I hope we’ll see you at the festival on Saturday or Sunday, but either way: Stay tuned for a post from Lauren tomorrow, and another post from me (on Featherweight fabric) on Sunday.

Have a great weekend!

Sweater Week: Featherweight

It’s no secret that I love the process of helping knitters achieve sweater nirvana – i.e., a garment that fits well, and that they love to wear. I feel incredibly lucky to be able to do what I do.

And it always gives me a particular thrill when I’m helping them start with someone else’s design, and identifying the modifications they’ll need to make to get a sweater that they love. It’s fun when we’re doing it with pencil and paper; it’s been even more fun to help people “mash up” a CustomFit pattern with a traditional design they’ve purchased.

For today’s Sweater Week installment, just in time for Rhinebeck, we’re taking it one step further.

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Hannah Fettig’s wildly popular Featherweight Cardigan is now built directly into the CustomFit site.

What does this mean?

Each new CustomFit Featherweight pattern is created specifically for you. You’ll get a finished sweater with the same gorgeous look and versatility as the original, but the pattern is crafted on the spot exclusively to your exact specifications:

  • We create the pattern specifically for your gauge. This means you can knit Featherweight at any gauge you like – the only thing that matters is whether you like your fabric!
  • We create the pattern specifically for your body. This means you don’t have to worry about choosing the right size, adjusting for differently-sized hips, busts, waists, shoulders, and arms. The set-in sleeve construction of this version of CustomFit Featherweight allows us to make a Featherweight pattern that will fit you everywhere.
  • You get to choose whether you’d like the original ¾-sleeve and shorter-length Featherweight pictured, or whether you’d like to adjust the sleeve and sweater length. The pattern will be built to your exact choices.

Excited? We sure are!

To celebrate, we’re running a KAL!

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We hope you’ll knit along with Hannah and I, here in the CustomFit Featherweight KAL group on Ravelry. Let us and the community support you as you choose your yarn, cast on and knit your Featherweight! Make sure to check out the Nitty Gritty KAL details on this page.

(Also: Many, many beautiful Featherweight cardigans have been knit from the original pattern. And if you have this version and want to participate in the KAL, you’re more than welcome to! We’d love to have you. A CustomFit Featherweight opens up a bunch of new possibilities, though, so we hope you’ll check it out!)

The KAL is sponsored by the amazing Quince and Co:

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If you’d like to knit a fingering weight version, take advantage of our sponsor’s special offer: Buy 4 or mores skeins of Quince & Co. Tern and receive 10% off! Offer good 10/16 & 10/17 ONLY, coupon code FEATHERWEIGHT.

I’m so thrilled about this new step in CustomFit’s evolution. (Not to mention being excited about knitting my own Featherweight, which I’ve wanted to do for years now! I’ll be using Tern, which is one of my all-time favorite yarns.)

I feel strongly about the importance of marrying wonderful design with well-fitting sweaters, and am beyond thrilled to be working with Hannah, who I admire very much. Sweater Week will continue throughout the weekend, and I’ll be back on Sunday with a post about fabric, specifically focused on Featherweight in different gauges and blends.

Until then: Here’s to fantastic and fully-customizable sweaters!

Sweater Week: Hakone and Bridgefield

Today in Sweater Week news, I get to share the results of a partnership with one of my favorite yarnies: Spirit Trail Fiberworks. I don’t remember exactly when I was introduced to Jennifer’s yarns (maybe a sock exchange in 2006?), but I’ve been an avid fan ever since.

And above all other bases, I love her wool, cashmere, and silk blends. She’s got them in a variety of weights – I worked my design Alta in her Birte – and I aspire to a laceweight sweater some day too.

But for this fall season, I decided to design sweaters both in the fingering-weight Sunna and the worsted-weight Verdande. Fingering weight yarns and worsted weight yarns both make fantastic sweaters, but the different weights do encourage different things in the design process. Unsurprisingly, I wound up with two very different sweaters at the end!

I love them both, though. And I’m very pleased to share both Hakone, and Bridgefield, with you for today’s installment of Sweater Week.


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Here’s a little bit about each sweater:

Hakone is the kind of design that cries out for a lightweight yarn: whispery but warm, elegant but relaxed, and as at home with jeans as something fancier.

It’s largely Stockinette, which lets the yarn shine through, with just a couple of key details. The 3/4 sleeves are worked straight with a bit of a notch, and the edges are trimmed in 3×2 ribbing. The worn-open style and mid-hip length are easygoing and comfortable.

Hakone is currently available only through CustomFit: you can create your own here.


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Bridgefield celebrates the best part of worsted-weight sweaters: this pullover is cozy and warm, almost sumptuous. It begs to be snuggled on a crisp fall day and looks equally great over a tank or a button-down.

The scale of worsted-weight yarn shows texture beautifully, and keeping the texture on the front of the sweater only prevents the garment from feeling heavy or bulky. As written, Bridgefield has a mid-hip length and long sleeves.

Bridgefield is also currently available only through CustomFit; you can get started here.


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And the even better news about Hakone and Bridgefield is that now, for all sweaters that are built into CustomFit you can change the sleeve and sweater lengths to suit your preference. This has been a long time coming, and we’re so excited about it.

Finally, let’s talk yarn. Anyone who has listened to me talk in person has heard me extoll the virtues of a wool/silk blend – the drape! the shine! the memory! – and the blend that Spirit Trail Fiberworks uses for their Nona, Sunna, Birte, and Verdande yarns is a particularly nice one. The Bombyx silk gives the yarns a gorgeous drape and sheen, the cashmere gives softness and an ever-so-subtle halo, and the merino blends it all together into one glorious package. If you’re going to be at Rhinebeck this weekend, or even if you aren’t, I urge you to give it a try.

Sweater Week: Rhinebeck Plans, and Amy’s #FFKAL sweater(s?)

Today in Sweater Week news, I wanted to share some of my own #FFKAL plans, and give you all a heads-up about where we’ll be & what we’ll be doing at the New York Sheep and Wool festival this weekend.

#FFKAL – Amy edition

I’ve knit a few sweaters so far this fall, but I’m not sure whether any of them really count as FFKAL sweaters. They’re all sweaters I am enjoying greatly, they’re sweaters I’d enjoy wearing in “real life”, so perhaps they count…

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…but on the other hand, somehow I haven’t thought of them as KAL sweaters, in my head. I don’t know why, truly.

Maybe it’s because they weren’t imagined solely as part of the KAL. The ideas for them came from all over, and included more inspiration than just “What would I most like to wear this fall?”. Which is fine of course! But for whatever reason, I’ve felt like I haven’t been fully participating in this KAL so far despite the frantic pace of my needles.

That changed this week.

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As of this week, I have a plan that came from musing at my own closet, I have an absolutely incredible wool that I’m beyond excited about. I also have a dozen outfits I want to wear with this sweater. This sweater feels totally indulgent to me, and I can’t wait to share progress with you!

Where in the New York Sheep & Wool Festival are Amy and Jackie?!

Unlike the past few years, I’m planning on spending my Rhinebeck in my favorite of relaxed-crowd-ambling mode. For most of the festival, Jackie and I will simply be wandering the fairgrounds. I’m impatient for the whole weekend in the best way possible. So if you see us wandering about, come say hi! We’ll have a bag of CustomFit buttons to share, and I’d love to see your festival sweater.

But we’ll be doing a couple of more “official” things too, and I’d absolutely love it if you’d join us for them as well.

Buttons! A CustomFit button helps tell the world how you got the awesome sweater you’re wearing, what you intend to use to knit your next sweater, or just that you think CustomFit is cool. We’ll have them with us, and they’ll also be available at the incredible Spirit Trail Fiberworks booth.

Book signing! I’ll be signing copies of Knit to Flatter in the book tent on Sunday from 1-2pm.

CustomFit Meet-ups! We’ll be doing two this year, on Saturday from 1:30 – 2:30pm, and on Sunday from 11:00am – 12:00pm. We’ll meet in the grassy, fieldy, leaf-strewn bits across the path from the lost and found / building E overhang (kind of between the number 13 and the main gate in this picture of last year’s map). If you joined us last year too, we’ll do the meet-ups in the same place. We’ll do a group photo each day, and we’ll also do a group Q&A session. So bring your questions, sweaters, and your awesome self! I can’t wait to see you.

(For those who have asked, we won’t be doing measurements this time around. I’d like to change up the experience from last year’s rapid-fire one-on-ones (which were wonderful but totally crazy-pants), and spend the meet-up time talking to everyone as a group, instead. If you’re looking for help with measurements though, don’t despair! We’ve got a new measurements tips & tricks video up on our YouTube channel, and there is a fantastic collection of CustomFit LYSes who’ve been fully trained, too.)

For me at least, the meet-ups are about getting together and sharing the inspiring feeling of loving the garments you’re knitting. I really hope to see you there.

Free CustomFit patterns! One more bit of awesomeness from Spirit Trail: not only will they have CustomFit buttons in their booth, but they’re running an amazing show special – purchase a sweater quantity of yarn, and get a coupon for a free CustomFit sweater. (This is a good idea in general, by the way! Leaving with a sweater quantity is practically a yearly tradition for me, now.)With or without a CustomFit coupon, it’s a great idea to grab yourself some Spirit Trail. But a free pattern is definitely pretty cool!

Sweater Week continues tomorrow with another design…

That’s all for today, folks! What are you knitting for the #FFKAL? Will you be at Rhinebeck, and will we see you? What’s got you inspired, this year?

Sweater Week: Coracle

It’s the week before Rhinebeck, and all through the house, lots of wool is a-stirring…

…which is to say, we have a lot of very exciting things set to come your way these next 7 days! For those of us in the Northeast US (and many from further away, too), the New York Sheep and Wool Festival is an absolute mecca – for yarn, for inspiration, for wonderful knitters of all types. I can’t wait for it, every year. And every year, when it’s over, I return to my “regular life” inspired and energized.

So, Sweater Week. A (new) yearly tradition here at AHD, where we spend a whole week loving the sweater. Showing off the sweaters we’ll wear this year, sure, but also… sharing our hopes, our dreams, our plans for that next outstanding garment, too.

We’ll be finalizing our Rhinebeck meet-up plans very shortly, but today I wanted to start by sharing a new sweater design that’s built right into the CustomFit site.

We’ve got so many sweaters coming up this week that I’d planned on starting with something that evokes a crisp fall New England day. But then I thought: Waaaaait a minute. I never followed up with the progress on my own SSKAL sweater! Remember the sleeve dilemma?

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Well, I added sleeves, and have been wearing this thing non-stop.

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I love this sweater with a fiery passion. I’m calling it Coracle, and it’s the first design that I’m releasing exclusively through the CustomFit site. It’s built right in – choose your materials, swatch until you get a fabric you love, and get a pattern that’s as easy to knit as a blanket, with gorgeous custom clothing results.

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When the #SSKAL started, I knew I wanted to do a sweater that really departed from my typical woolly-wools. So I began by using a new yarn I found very exciting: Truesilk by Rowan. This is a 100% silk yarn, which is glorious for drape, sheen, and color. But it’s also chainette construction, which means it’s wonderfully elastic to work with. It produced a fabric that’s closer to what I can buy in the store than anything I’ve ever created with my needles.

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Now, for the nitty-gritty: This is a mid-hip, wide scoop neck pullover with tapered 3/4 sleeves. It’s trimmed with 2×2 ribbing, and the back is knit in plain Stockinette. The front is in an allover open mesh lace pattern (which has a gauge that’s essentially equivalent to Stockinette), and the sweater is written with waist shaping on the back only for ease of knitting and a more slouchy, relaxed feel to the garment.

The result is pretty much my most favorite sweater I’ve ever knit for myself. Want to make one for you, too? Click here to get started!

(Of course, later this week I’m going to get started giving Coracle a run for its money. I’m out to create a new wardrobe staple for myself, and I’m so excited about this one that I can’t even stand it. I hope you will be, too. Want a hint?

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See you soon!)

#FFKAL Progress

Now that I’ve been back from the Retreat for a week, I’ve settled in enough to tell you about all the knitting I’ve been up to for the Fall Festival KAL. I promised pictures of my Peabody Pullover after the retreat, and boy oh boy, did Amy deliver. I’m lucky to have such a talented photographer for a boss.

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Here I am laughing at a RIDICULOUS dance Jackie was doing.

As you may remember, this is a CustomFit adaptation of Peabody by Leila Raabe. I made a few changes to the pattern as written (besides running it through CustomFit!):

  • Shortened the hem ribbing to 2″. The original has very long ribbing as a design element, but I knew that wouldn’t work for my hips. (Though my hips are definitely wider than my bust, you could say I’m a proportional shape due to my linebacker shoulders! Nevertheless, stretching a vast expanse of ribbing over my hips isn’t a flattering look for my shape.)
  • Changed the sleeves to 3/4 instead of long. This was entirely motivated by lack of yarn: I finished with a swatch and a half left, so I think I did a good job of maximizing the yarn I had!

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This is me trying to look cool. #dork

I was very happy with my yarn choice — Miss Babs Heartland. I think it would be a great option for a knitter who’s had trouble with their sweaters growing due to using superwash wool. It’s hand-dyed, but not treated to be superwash, so it has the great depth of color so many knitters crave, while retaining the “scales” wool uses to hold its shape.

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Just hangin’ on a dock in Maine, NBD.

If you’re a CustomFit Maker, look for more coming soon about how to adapt a traditional pattern like Peabody using CustomFit in the “Amy’s Tip” section of Maker Central. This sweater will be featured as the example — I’m finally famous!

Remember when I said I was going to knit three sweaters in three months for the Fall Festival KAL? So far it’s going swimmingly. After finishing Peabody, I dropped everything to knit a sample of one of Amy’s designs to be released at the Make. Wear. Love. Retreat. Thirteen days, size four needles, sportweight yarn … let’s just say it was a close one, but I’m so happy with the result. We’re releasing the patterns very soon, but here’s a quick preview for you …

Getting this 4x4 ribbing to line up was a pain, but truly worth it in the end!

Getting this 4×4 ribbing to line up was a pain, but truly worth it in the end.

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Here’s the three sweaters you’ll see coming soon… how tantalizing!

The good news is, I’m well on my way through the third sweater, and should finish all three with no problem at all. If you follow us on Instagram, you saw my ingenious swatch-drying machine (it involved a mesh office chair, bobby pins, and a fan…) and my progress thus far:

I love this color. Gold for days.

I love this color. Gold for days.

It’s going to be a simple cowl-neck pullover. I love the color of the yarn, but I’m not sure I’m sold on the fabric it makes… too bad I didn’t discover this until halfway through my fifth skein! More to come when I finish it, though sadly I won’t see Amy (and thus be able to coerce her into taking my photos) until after the KAL is over. My lazy iPhone shots will have to do!

How’s your progress coming? The KAL ends on November 15, so you still have plenty of time to knit a CustomFit sweater!

A Kindness of Knitters

During our closing ceremonies at the make, wear, love retreat this weekend, someone shared a wonderful quote from the wonderful Cat Bordhi: That the word for a collection of knitters is “a kindness”.

I couldn’t agree more, and feel so incredibly lucky to have spent the weekend with such amazing people. I’m looking forward to sharing more of it with you. For the moment I’m still unpacking here, and diving back into the craziness of life with the boys with passion and excitement…

…but I’m pausing as I do so, to smell the last bits of salt air in my clothes, and remember the feeling of being surrounded by a wonderful and warm group who share my passions.

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A kindness, indeed.

make, wear, love: the sweater class

I’ve heard it often from former students:

“It all made so much sense at the time, but now that I’ve got a sweater on the needles I’m not sure: What did you say about this, again?”

It’s one of the most wonderful things about taking a sweater class through a local yarn store. And if you’re near one of our wonderful CustomFit stores, I strongly encourage you to take such a class.

But CustomFit LYS isn’t everywhere. And although teaching is one of my favorite things in the world, I can’t be everywhere either.

This fall, I’m addressing those challenges by trying something new:

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Starting next week, I’ll be running a live, online class that will help you make a phenomenal sweater with CustomFit – give you the skills you’ll need to make fantastic future garments, as well.

Through six one-hour group class sessions plus two individual one-on-one sessions, I’ll guide you through your sweater knitting process from measurements to swatching to finishing and beyond. This isn’t a webinar, or a pre-recorded set of lectures. It’s a live, interactive class with me, online. Having multiple live sessions will give us the time and flexibility to help you through your actual sweater knitting in real time. I’ll help you make great choices, answer the questions you have along the way, and see you through to the end.

Each class session will have both a specific topic and time for your questions and discussion. We’ll cover the following topics in addition to your questions:

  • CustomFit itself – what the site can do, what it can’t, and how to use it to get a sweater you love
  • Body measurements and Fit to Flatter principles – learn how to best fit and flatter your own beautiful bod
  • Sweater fabric – matching materials to design, what constitutes a good sweater fabric, and (optionally) how to match fiber to stitch pattern choices
  • Finishing – how to properly finish your sweater pieces for professional results
  • Advanced CustomFit design topics – how to use the custom sweater wizard to design the sweater of your dreams
  • One-on-one instruction – You’ll have two 15-minute personal sessions with Amy as part of your course fee.

There will be two sessions of this class: A Monday evening class that meets weekly at 8pm EST, and a Sunday class that meets roughly bi-weekly, at 12pm EST. The class sessions will be run as group video-teleconferences; the one-on-one sessions will also be run as video calls. Class dates for the Monday session are: 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3. Sunday session: 10/5, 10/12, 11/2, 11/16, 11/30, 12/7.

The cost for the entire class, which includes the class sessions, one-on-one instruction, and a CustomFit pattern, is $125.

You can find out more information on this page, and you can sign up here. (Space is limited and sign-ups will be first-come, first-served. You’ll receive confirmation within 24 hours of sign-up.)

Are you ready for a fantastic fall sweater? I’m really excited about this chance to work with students in a more intimate and ongoing way than my marathon teaching weekends allow. I hope you’ll join me!